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USS Constitution – Hull – Diorama 2

Now all that remained was to gradually fill in the remaining space with all the other activities I wanted to show.  I put in first activities that were related to the two already modeled.  For instance, early on I modeled the charcoal kiln and the workers making charcoal for the forge and wheeling it to the smithy.  At the same time, I build small boxes to hold metal stock and filled the shelves adjacent to the smithy.  The charcoal kiln was made from Sculpey.

 

I also made up several wheel barrows and a small wagon to hold various things.  I used one for the charcoal, one for the deadeyes later, and the wagon to hold the deadeyes with iron work installed.

 

 

Then I went back to the other end of the shipyard, and made up a platform saw and modeled cut planks and the men handling them.  Then I put in some timbers to make a floor for the second level of the saw shed and stored some planks there.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then I had space to add the timber stock piles and some crosscutting sawyers.  And piles of cut lumber for decking and planking.  And the crews handling the cut lumber including the men rigging a load for the crane to lift onto the deck of the hull.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then a pile of curved timber and crotch pieces and the men working to square timber and to adze the bentwood into shape for knees and other bracing timbers.

Then a couple of pole lathes, one making deadeyes.  And a man on a carving horse roughing out rough stock for spindle turning. And a man drilling holes in the deadeyes and a man wheeling them to the smithy for the ironwork to be added.

Now, with the addition of a few idlers and spare hands, the ground level of the yard was getting pretty complete.  I added more detail on the ground, some litter and clutter, lots of sawdust, and used some gloss varnish to model the wet sand and shallow water at the end of the ways.  It was getting to look pretty much as I wanted.

 

Sock Yarn Shawls – Part 7 – falcon

This piece is knitted from the center of the somewhat abstract bird like figure, done in a golden sock yarn, which shades gradually to an orange color.  I took advantage of the color changes to make the  body of the animal in one color and the wings in a different shade.

Once the animal motif was completed, the ground was filled in using a dark charcoal sock yarn.  Lots of short rows and circles, of course.

 

Here are some detail photos of the shawl to show the  construction.

This shows the center of the body of the animal.  This was created by casting on maybe 20 stitches, then knitting into the back of the cast on stitches and then around to create a circular knit, which was a distorted circle.  Then short rows to make a more ovoid shape.  Then more short rows for base of wings, and so forth.

 

Here you can see more of the construction of the “bird” as well as the use of small circles and short rows in the background.  You can also see how the color gradation of the yarn was used, and the use of the pattern repeats in the short rows to create feather like patterns in the wings.

 

This is a photo of the finished shawl on the blocking mats.

 

 

 

 

Torpedoes Part 3

Once I thought I had solved the problem of limiting the run of the torpedoes, i hoped to convert to rechargeable batteries.  I could not find rechargeable AAAA NiCad batteries, so decided to use 3.7 v LiPo batteries for the power.  I had also looked at 3 v Lithium batteries, but preferred that the batteries be rechargeable.

This photo shows the various batteries used or considered for use in the torpedoes.  The AAA s are on the right, the AAAA next and the rechargeable LiPoly 3.7 v on the left.  The LiPoly battery is a bit longer and that required some redesign of the torpedo.  Penalty, I guess, for the innate need to tinker, to fix things not broken.  The quarter is slightly larger diameter than the inside diameter of the PVC tubing used for the body of the torpedo.

I turned additional wooden parts for more torpedoes, eliminating the long insert and O-Ring grooves in the rear section, to shorten the drive shaft.  I also lengthened the nose section and shortened the center PVC section.  The plan was to hollow out the nose section a bit more and use it to hold both the switches, as the longer battery and the motor would take up most of the room in the PVC section.

On the left are two first run nose cones with slide switches installed, shown in open and closed position.  After some trials, I shortened the slides by half so they did not protrude into the PVC section.  On the right is a comparison of the first generation rear section, with longer insert and O-Ring grooves, against the second generation version, which is identical except for shorter insert.

To power the additional torpedoes, I ordered more of the small electric motors used in the first version.  These new ones, however, had slightly larger diameter shafts than the original ones I used requiring modification of the polystyrene tubing coupler connecting the motor to the prop shaft.  So it goes.  See above under “tinkering”.

As for the original, the props were cut from 0.016″ copper sheet.  I drilled a 1/8″ hole in the center of the discs to be shaped into props and once the props had been cut and filed into shape, I secured them to a shaft of 1/8″ solid brass rod by soldering a length of 5/31″ brass tube in front and in back of the prop.  The tubing is about 3/4 ” long forward of the prop, and the 6″ long brass rod has another piece of 5/32″ tubing soldered to the inside end with the tubing protruding about 1/4″ beyond the end of the rod.  This arrangement created two bearing surfaces (the 5/32″ tubing) when the shaft is installed in the 3/16″ brass tubing, 6″ long, used as the stuffing box.  This also permits light grease or oil to be placed in between the two bearing surfaces when the torpedo is assembled for lubrication and water seal.

With the shortened PVC section (to lower weight), the motor and longer battery were a tight fit, but by hollowing out the nose cone almost entirely and placing the switches in the nose, I managed to get everything to fit.  The battery comes with JST plug, so I used a JST female connector for that plug, and also a second pair of connectors to allow the switches to be disconnected and the nose cone removed when servicing/charging the battery.